Got a First Offence Stunt Driving in Ontario? Here’s What to Know

If you’ve received a stunt driving first offence, Ontario laws and penalties can be quite strict and severe. For example, if a police officer stops you for exceeding the speed limit by 50 km or more (the most common offence that’s classified as stunt driving), You will get a drivers licence suspension for seven days and your vehicle will be impounded for seven days – even if you were never convicted of stunt driving or racing in the past. 

If you are convicted, you can face fines of up to $10,000, get six demerit points, or be sentenced to a maximum of six months in jail. On top of that, the conviction can have a lasting effect on your life, including a license suspension of up to 10 years and increased insurance premiums.  

The seriousness of being charged with stunt driving means you should learn as much as you can about the offence to minimize the impact of a conviction. 

4 Things to Know if You Got a First Offence Stunt Driving in Ontario

There are lots of myths about what is considered stunt driving and the implications of receiving a stunt driving ticket.

  1. You Should Get Legal Advice – Again, due to its gravity, the most important step you can take if you are charged with stunt driving is to get legal advice and representation in court from lawyers and experts well-versed in how to fight a stunt driving ticket.

  2. It’s Not Just for Speeding – While exceeding the speed limit by 50 km or more is the most common reason for a stunt driving ticket, the Ontario Highway Traffic Act outlines many more, including:
    1. Doing burnouts, drifts or donuts
    2. Driving while you’re not in the driver’s seat, or with someone in the trunk
    3. Jumping the green light at an intersection to make a left turn before oncoming traffic begins to move.

  3. The Costs of Getting a Ticket Are All Yours – If you are stopped and given a traffic ticket for stunt driving, the consequences are all your responsibility, including the financial ones.
    1. If your license is suspended and/or vehicle impounded, you must find and pay for your own transportation (police officers are only obligated to take you to a safe place).
    2. You are responsible for the costs of towing your vehicle to the impoundment lot and the cost of storage for the duration of the impoundment.
    3. You must pay a $180 fee to get your driver’s license reinstated. 
  1. You Will Likely need to Make More Than One Court Appearance – When you get the ticket, you will also get a summons to appear in court. You or your licensed legal representative must appear in court or face a bench summons for your arrest. If you do not intend to plead guilty at that first court appearance, another court date will be set for your trial.

If you’ve been charged with stunt driving, make sure to get the right legal team to fight for you. Our team at X-Copper is ready to fight your stunt driving offence to get you the best possible result. Contact us today to get our team behind you.
If you found this post helpful, check out our recent article about how long a speeding ticket stays on your record in Ontario.




How Long Does A Speeding Ticket Stay On Your Record In Ontario

While “how long does a speeding ticket stay on your record in Ontario?” sounds like it should have a fairly straightforward answer, it can have many answers.

For a number of reasons, tickets for exceeding the speed limit are among the most common driving tickets issued by Ontario police. Primarily, speeding is a leading cause of road fatalities in Ontario, so police forces are eager to prevent it. Secondly, radar makes it comparatively easy to enforce speed limits compared to detecting other Highway Traffic Act violations, like following too closely.

Three Different Records of Your Speeding Ticket

It’s important to know that the speeding ticket you get today does not appear on any record of your driving until you are convicted of the offence. If you’re wondering how long a ticket stays on your record, you’re probably most concerned about how it impacts your insurance rates. Speeding convictions can stay on your record in three different ways and they can affect car insurance rates for differing lengths of time.

  1. Your Driver’s Abstract – This is what’s commonly known as your driving record. Convictions can affect your auto insurance rates more than anything else on your abstract.

  2. Your Demerit Points – While they are included in your driver’s abstract, demerit points stay on your record for only two years. Demerit points generally don’t affect your insurance coverage by themselves. The main exception being if your license is suspended due to the number of demerit points on your record.
  3. Your Insurance Company’s Records – To set the rates they charge each driver, insurers will check driver’s abstracts on a semi-regular basis. Depending on your driving history and how long you’ve been a customer, they may not check your record for two or three years. Your insurance rates are not affected by traffic tickets until your insurance company checks your driving record and discovers a conviction. In some cases, if the conviction expires on your driver’s abstract before it appears in your insurance company records, your rates may not be affected.

Up next, here’s what you should always have in your car’s emergency kit.




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What Should You Do If You’re in a Minor Collision?

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Police Crack Down during Ontario’s Thanksgiving Weekend

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Re: Inconsistent radar testing casts doubt

canada speeding

Today CBC news published an article titled “Inconsistent radar testing casts doubt on validity of millions of speeding tickets”. For your reference, see the article written by Marnie Luke, Lori Ward, and CBC News here: www.cbc.ca/news/canada/speeding-tickets

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How a Medical Condition Can Impact Your Driver’s License

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